Unprecedented achievement

Quest's rookie point guard Denzel Laguerta slices through multiple Camosun defenders on his way to the hoop. - Brian Jones Photo

Quest’s rookie point guard Denzel Laguerta slices through multiple Camosun defenders on his way to the hoop. – Brian Jones Photo

There’s a routine that PacWest teams are used to when they visit Vancouver Island. They come over on the ferry, play in Victoria on Friday night at 8 pm, and then travel up to Nanaimo the next day to play at 3 pm, or vice-versa.

For the Quest University Kermodes, it was no different at the provincial championships.

On Thursday night, they were pitted against tournament hosts Camosun College in the 8 pm timeslot. The stands were completely packed, but held a surprisingly even amount of fans from both sides. Camosun had a strong contingent of supporters due to the home court advantage, but Quest had a bus full of students and family make the trek over from Squamish.

The game was an anomaly. Incredibly low scoring plagued both squads but the intensity and emotion was unrivaled.

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Island teams prove too much for Men’s Eagles

Kwantlen Eagles centre Ali Bosir. (Brian Jones Photo)

Kwantlen Eagles centre Ali Bosir. (Brian Jones Photo)

Usually after a basketball game, the losing team can pinpoint the reasons for what went wrong. Maybe it was a buzzer beater, too many turnovers, poor shooting, lack of defensive intensity, or the other team simply caught fire.

When more than one of those factors occurs in the same night, it’s often perceived as bad luck. It wasn’t their night. The basketball gods weren’t in their favour. The other team got hot and they didn’t.

They’re all completely plausible reasons for an in-game breakdown.

But when it happens over and over and over again, and the losses begin to snowball, and the standings look like a rock wall with no place to grip – it becomes more than just bad luck.

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